Archive for February, 2009

Getting the Connection Right

February 24th, 2009 by Heather Maloney

In our last edition of eNudge News, I listed the following as the first of the 4 Keys for Business Growth in 2009:

Create a plan for your marketing communications with the intention of connecting with your audience, educating and providing value. I believe this should be the sole purpose of your messages – the repeat sales, new customers and profits will flow automatically if you connect, educate and provide value.

I really can’t emphasize enough the importance of connecting with and providing value to your audience.

Your contacts really want to feel like you are speaking to them, about something that is actually relevant and useful to them. Otherwise they will stop reading your messages.

You will never achieve a feeling of connection through your emails or sms messages unless you:

  1. Put yourself in the shoes of your contacts, and think about (or ask them directly) what they want to hear about before putting together your messages or your special offers.
  2. Send your message to subsets of your list so that you can ensure that the message is relevant to the contacts that receive the message. This might require you to write more than one version of your newsletter for instance.
  3. Write your message in a communication style that makes people feel like you are sitting down having a coffee with them – try and visualise that as you are writing your message.
  4. Personalise your message, perhaps also the subject line. I mention this last, because personalisation is possibly the least important of these 4 points. Of course, the more you personalise a message the better. eNudge allows you to personalise your message in an unlimited manner because you can add your own special fields to any campaign. Have you considered adding a personalised paragraph for specific contacts that is very personal to them e.g. ‘it was great meeting with you last week…’?

A recent Borders email gave a great example of personalisation. If you have a look at the image to the right, you will see that Borders have included the contacts name in the front cover of a new book, as the co-author of a new book. Seeing my name on the front cover of a book certainly got my attention!

With regard to providing value, I would also like to share a recent experience I had while shopping in a specialist clothing store. I’m not much of a shopper, so having found this particular store which had some great products, but not enough of the items that I wanted, I was keen to be added to their mailing list to hear when new stock arrived. I was very disappointed to be told that they don’t do any emailing at present, and that I should just drop by the store every so often when I’m nearby to see if they have new stock. Hmmmm…. where’s the value in that? This experience reminded me that businesses that are doing email marketing in Australia are fairly unique.

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Email Experience Council (EEC) working on new definitions for email measurements

February 24th, 2009 by Heather Maloney

The EEC has been working on a new set of definitions to help email marketers see consistency in measurements used to gauge the successfulness of an email campaign.

In a nutshell (so that you don’t have to go through the rather dry documentation) they are recommending that:

  • the term open rate be changed to render rate, which more accurately describes what we are measuring: the fact that we know that an email has been opened because an image we included in it has been rendered in the email client.
  • an action rate be used to measure the number of renders + click throughs. At the moment, eNudge determines that if a person clicks on a URL that they have actually also opened the email, for obvious reasons. The EEC is recommending that these are kept separate as renders and clicks, but collated into one action rate measure which will add the two together.

The EEC are seeking input from email marketers and email service providers (like eNudge) into the new terms.

In terms of the way eNudge measures email activity, I would really like your feedback on these two questions:

1. Do you want to know if one person has opened your emails multiple times?

2. Would you like to know that someone has clicked on a link, but not rendered the images of your email?

3. Would you like to know if an email has actually reached the inbox (whether it was deleted, read or not)?

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