Archive for the ‘Technology’ Category

Implications of the new Privacy Act on Email and SMS Marketing

February 13th, 2017 by Heather Maloney

privacy act changes and email and sms marketing Okay … this may seem a little dry, but hang in there; we will get to the nitty gritty as quickly as possible.

Email and SMS marketing in Australia is not only impacted by the Australian Spam Act 2003, but also the Privacy Act 1988 (as amended by the Privacy Amendment (Enhancing Privacy Protection) Act 2012). The Privacy Amendment Act came into force on the 12 March, 2014 and created a single set of Australian Privacy Principles (APPs) applying to both Australian Government agencies and the private sector, with some special situations for the medical profession. Whilst the Privacy Act does not apply to small businesses (those with an annual revenue of less than $3,000,000), it is best practice to adhere to the legislation regardless of your size.

As I see it, the most important change in the Privacy Act was more stringent disclosure about where your data can be stored, and ensuring that government agencies do not store their data offshore except in some very specific situations. NB: if you do provide your data to offshore organisations, you are responsible for ensuring that they do not breach the Australian privacy principles.

When undertaking email and SMS marketing, in order to comply with the Privacy legislation we recommend that you:

  • Use eNudge, because your data is stored on Australian servers, not off-shore and because eNudge makes it easy for people to un-subscribe (this requirement is now included in both the Privacy legislation as well as the Australian Spam Act).
  • Only store in eNudge the information that you absolutely require in order to be able to personalise your messages and analyse your campaign results.
  • Do not store or personalise on government identifiers e.g. tax file numbers and the like.
  • Document and follow your privacy policy, and have it easily accessible via your website.
  • Include a link to your privacy policy within your email message – your email footer is the best place for this.

What should be in your privacy policy?

  1. The kinds of personal information your collect & keep.
  2. How you hold it e.g. with eNudge you might say that your information is stored in a secure online database, within Australian servers, and only accessible by appropriate employees.
  3. For what purpose you collect, store, use and disclose the personal information, and most importantly, identifying where the disclosure may take place overseas including identifying the country.
  4. How a person can view & request correction of the personal information you are storing about them.
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Design-centric Application Development

December 6th, 2016 by Kaveh Saket

Design-centric application development

A design-centric approach to application development (that’s web applications and mobile applications – is there any other sort these days??) differs from customer-centric or technology-centric approaches which have been more common of recent years. A design-centric approach focuses primarily on ensuring that the user experience is perfect – or perhaps more accurately “nearly perfect”.

There is always room for improvement – another revision, a new update – and users want continual improvement to make their life easier. User experience has been made king because research shows that organisations which focus on design significantly outperform those who don’t.

In a customer-centric approach the customer is asked what they want, and then the designer will set about delivering to their requirements. In a technology-driven approach, the technologists build the best algorithm or new solution to solve a particular problem and then look for a customer who values the technical solution. However, following a design-centric approach the designer will research the best current solutions in the problem landscape, put themselves in the customer’s shoes, and determine to provide the simplest way to achieve the desired goals. Gathering feedback on the design from a variety of potential users of different levels of expertise follows, and leads to iterative refinement until the first version is achieved. The developers – the people who turn the design into reality – are then directed by the design team to ensure that the intended outcome is achieved.

The Uber mobile app is a great example of design-centric application development, which is a significant factor in its amazing success. Anyone who has used the Uber App will agree – from being able to see where the on-approach vehicle is on the map, along with the number of minutes until it arrives continuously updated until arrival, to seeing a photo of the driver and vehicle, one press to make a call to the driver, and immediate payment upon arriving at the destination without needing to handover a credit card. I could go on and on about the ease with which you can hail an Uber, and receive a brilliant experience of private transport…

One of the challenges of current application design is dealing with content. Having little visible content is a very quick way to send users heading for the hills … imagine Instagram with no photos when you launch it, or Twitter with no tweets to read, or Facebook with no posts. However, masses of content with no simple way to navigate it, can be just as off-putting. Requiring a user to search has been the standard approach for many years. Filtering and other ways of helping the visitor to easily drill down to the content they are most interested in, have developed more recently.

At Contact Point we have been embracing SCRUM methodology across our organisation, which also readily supports a design-centric approach. Starting with our client’s goals and objectives within their particular competitive landscape, and their customers’ wants and needs, we will:

  • undertake research into common solutions to the design problem at hand,
  • brainstorm other potential approaches with trusted and experienced colleagues,
  • wire frame the potential solution, getting feedback along the way,
  • apply creative design to the wire framed solution,
  • carry out user testing of the design, iterating as necessary to refine the solution, and
  • finally develop the solution, taking care to ensure that the essence of the planned user interaction is achieved

The above steps will be undertaken for each logical entity that collectively forms the solution, at the same time ensuring consistency throughout the solution as appropriate. After the development of each component, real user testing of people across a broad range of skill levels, will then lead to further refinement. Programmatic A/B testing will allow two or more potential solutions to be tested head to head to ensure the best solution evolves.

The successful execution of a design-centric approach involves many steps, and requires an appetite for iteration, well beyond the launch of a new solution. However, the results are impressive, and for all but the simplest of tasks, likely the only way to achieve raving fans of your solution. Design-centric doesn’t mean that the customer is ignored. In fact the opposite is true with a greater focus on experience combined with needs and wants. Neither is technology ignored – utilizing the most up to date and elegant technology is also paramount to ensuring a great user experience.

What is the best user interface you have experienced from a web or mobile application?

 

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Consumer Decision Journey – throw out the Sales Funnel model!

November 8th, 2016 by Heather Maloney

image-consumer-decision-journey
As the creator of a broadly used email and SMS marketing solution (eNudge) for the Australia marketplace, I thought that over the years I would see a general improvement in the way email marketing campaigns were constructed and delivered. I’m sad to say that on the whole, nothing much has changed. eNudge provides a myriad tools to help you segment, target, automate, measure and analyse, but it’s in the execution where many people fall down. Business owners and marketers get busy, and then just flick off a quick email to get a spike in sales. They are content with a spike and move on.

However, I know there is a better way … there always has been. Many marketers refer to it as lead nurturing, and email campaigns (including the eNudge Message Series functionality) are an excellent way to nurture your leads. For many years, marketing personnel have been working with a Sales Funnel model in mind – a linear movement of a potential buyer through awareness, interest, desire and finally action (buy). Lead nurturing refers to understanding where your lead is in the sales funnel, and give them the next piece of information that they need to take them to the next step in the journey; the next step closer towards being ready to buy.

I could be placated if I saw email marketing being used more for lead nurturing … more value and information being supplied, in a logical flow, engaging with potential buyers and taking them down a path to understanding and trusting you. However, thoughts even on lead nurturing have moved on …

The changing landscape of information availability via the internet including the impact of social media, and more recent research into buyer behaviour, suggests throwing out the sales funnel model and replacing it with what is being called by McKinsey as the “Consumer Decision Journey“. McKinsey research revealed that far from systematically narrowing their choices, today consumers take a much more iterative and less reductive journey of four stages: 1/ consider, 2/ evaluate, 3/ buy, and 4/ enjoy, advocate, bond. During stage 2 (evaluate) where the Sales Funnel approach says the the options get narrowed down, this in reality is where the brands most active online often replace the brands that were in the original consideration list (perhaps added to the list because of traditional advertising). The consumer’s options actually expand during this phase and the originals often get thrown out where there isn’t enough information online or customer reviews to support them.

Even more critical in what is being seen now in consumer behaviour, McKinsey discovered that during the 4th stage (enjoy-advocate-bond) more than 60% of consumers conduct online research about the products after purchase – a touch point entirely missing from the sales funnel approach. It is during this after purchase where your customer will advocate for your product or service by word of mouth, and produce online content to help future consumers in the consider and evaluate phases.

Other recent research by the Harvard Business Review team has shown that achieving the “full” sale to a B2B client is best achieved by providing the opportunity for that client to purchase small prototypes or incremental products along the buying journey i.e. as part of the evaluate stage. For more about this read: “To Increase Sales, Get Customers to Commit a Little at a Time“.

It was no small task, but the Harvard Business Review article describes an example implementation of changing the view of marketing to that of the ‘Consumer Decision Journey’ lead to a new TV becoming the top seller on Amazon.com and the company’s best performer in retail stores, far exceeding the marketers’ expectations.

To ensure that your product or service is not thrown out by prospects during the Evaluate phase of the consumer journey, and to help new customers to Enjoy, Advocate and Bond:

  1. Make sure your product or service is present online, not only in your own website, but also in comparison sites and marketplaces (for B2C) and online communities (for B2B)
  2. Foster online reviews of your products and services via social media and 3rd party websites
  3. Provide rich and easily accessible information online for people who have already purchased your product or service to help them get the most out of it
  4. Introduce new ways to inspire existing customers to refer their friends and colleagues to you – think DropBox who give away additional storage space for referring business

Your email marketing activities should assist you with with each of the above. Email campaigns should be created specifically for new customers and should point to additional online resources, and specifically ask for reviews or feedback. Email campaigns to your wider database should reference case studies and additional information available to help prospects in the evaluate phase.

If you need help with:

  • creating incremental or prototype products to sell to your clients as they evaluate,
  • creating additional online content,
  • making your online content more engaging,
  • ensuring you have a vibrant social media presence,
  • ensuring your product or service can be found easily online (SEO), or
  • creating email marketing campaigns that engage,

don’t hesitate to get in touch.

We are passionate about helping businesses to grow using online technologies.

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Gamification of your online store

October 28th, 2015 by Heather Maloney

gamificationAll of you who attended the Melbourne Business Network event yesterday morning with me, and heard James Tuckerman speak about “5 disruptive trends and tactics that will reinvent how business is done in 2016″, will undoubtedly have been considering how you can implement gamification.

Gamification is “the application of game-design elements and game principles in non-game contexts” (source).

But first, if you are interested in some recent statistics on the impact of gamification, here’s an article I found which is a quick read: Gamification in 2015: Top Statistics and Facts. Here’s some more facts and figures.

Here’s a quick brainstorm on how to implement gamification into the online shopping experience (without culling the ridiculous … yes, aliens may get a mention).

Let’s get the obvious out the way first:

  • For first time customers (you can work that out based on their email address) after successful payment immediately reward them with a ‘first time customer’ badge, and give them something as a reward – that might be an additional extra product thrown into their first delivery, a discount off their next purchase, reward points …

By the way, before I go on … congratulations on choosing to read this blog, and getting past the first few paragraphs! Click here to get your reward. Seriously now, click!

Now where were we … okay, back to the perhaps less obvious ideas (and you wouldn’t necessarily do all of these things simultaneously):

  1. After the customer adds an item into their shopping cart, congratulate them with a badge and explain that they are x steps closer to owning their new item. Sounds, visuals and a feeling of game play are important aspects of gamification; so don’t make it too boring.
  2. As the customer works their way through the checkout, make it into a game … giving them fun visuals showing that they are progressing through the purchasing of their prize.
  3. For returning customers, give them a different reward compared to first timers … perhaps accrue points towards their free / goal purchase. To make this feel like a game, perhaps avoid a “frequent flier points” style point system, and lean more towards collecting cute ‘widgets’ to achieve a goal number of ‘widgets’.
  4. For customers who click through from your purchase confirmation email, to track the progress of their order or shipping, show them another badge – the excited shopper award perhaps! Make this sometimes anxious stage of the wait fun for your customer, and ease their mind that their parcel is on the way.
  5. For customers who click through to view your terms and conditions or payment security page, show them another badge – the careful shopper award perhaps. Again, this helps you to turn this more serious matter into something more light hearted and friendly.

Alright … there’s the brainstorm. You’ve probably thought of a few more, so please add to the above list via the comments!

Or tell us if you have noticed gamification popping up in business websites, like the DropBox example 1 and example 2?

NB: There is a real life prize for the first comment added to this blog post. You will receive your surprise gift in the mail.

 

 

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Review of my Samsung Smart Watch, 2 months on

July 30th, 2015 by Heather Maloney

Two months on, I’m very happy to keep wearing my smart watch – a Samsung Gear which connects to my Samsung 5 smart phone – albeit quite chunky on my skinny wrist, and taking up another power point for charging approximately every 3 days. It’s also important to appreciate that you need to have your smart phone nearby – about 15 – 20 metres, so the distance between my board room and my desk works perfectly well.

Samsung Gear 2

The Gear 2 is by no means the latest Samsung smart watch available – I chose that, nearly obsolete, model because it has a smaller face size than the new ones, a larger face will just look silly on my wrist. Perhaps the larger faces will eventually becoming thinner making it more palatable… we’ll see.

During the last 2 months, it’s been quite the talking point. Here’s my list of benefits of having a smart watch:

  • phone call screening – when I am not my desk I often don’t have my phone with me, and when I’m walking somewhere, handbag over shoulder, getting my phone out of my handbag can take several all-important seconds when you’re trying to get to a call. In these situations, I can simply lift the watch up and it automatically activates the screen so that I can see who is calling.
  • phone call answering when I can’t get to the phone – it’s as simple as swiping on the green answer button to take the call. The caller is of course on speaker at that point, but it can be better than missing an important call. Switching back to normal phone mode is easily done once I get back to my phone.
  • time :) I am happy to report that I can tell the time very easily using the watch – as you lift your wrist, the watch screen automatically turns on. You can choose a clock face from a variety of options, and also choose the background colour to match your clothes. However, it being an orange watch, I don’t tend to choose colours very often.
  • pedometer – I have just recently taken up exercise again (to deal with the winter pounds) so I started up the pedometer on my watch, and the watch automatically sent through the number of steps to my Samsung Health app on the phone, and automatically resets everyday so I can see whether I have been active enough on any given day, and of course do something about it!

Some things I don’t like:

  • email notifications – having your watch beside your bed going off at all hours of the night because another email came through was never going to be good, so that was left on all of about 5 minutes. The number of notifications I would have on the watch during the day as well would drive me mad, so I don’t use the phone to view emails.
  • running out of battery in the middle of the day – you end up with a useless piece of technology strapped to your wrist, and don’t know the time!
  • heart rate monitor – not that I’m too concerned about this, but I don’t find the heart rate monitor very successful on the phone; probably something to do with not having it strapped tightly enough to my wrist.

There are lots of other things I can do using the watch, including checking social media updates and the like. Practically every notification you can get on your phone you can also get on the watch. However, I don’t really need more notifications of that nature.

I’m still considering a feature/app to have our app development team build, in order to help me benefit more the device.

Of course the Apple iWatch has come out in the last couple of months. Here is an interesting review of the iWatch.

I look forward to hearing from others wearing a Samsung Smart Watch, or an Apple iWatch for that matter. How do you benefit from your smart watch?

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Integrating your shopping cart with the Google Shopping API

July 29th, 2015 by Harry Liu

The use of Google shopping is becoming more popular in Australia. The norm used to be that you would use the main Google search box, or more recently just type your search terms into the address bar and press enter, to find and compare products. Using this method, the search results is usually a list of websites, requiring you to view many sites to find the best purchase, or if you trusted them, you could use a comparison site to find you the best deal. Now we can use Google Shopping – https://www.google.com.au/shopping – to search items from a collection of ecommerce websites.
google-shopping-example

A search in Google Shopping returns an easy to navigate set of products (images, names, ratings, price) with multiple searching options, a powerful filter to narrow down the set of recommendations, and a Shortlist feature to help you select the product to purchase. Clicking on a product allows you to see more details, including any reviews, and then click through to purchase the product from the original vendor. However Google will only list products that have been submitted by an eCommerce website – Google doesn’t go out and gather product information to populate Google Shopping, as it does with the regular search engine results.

The simplest way to submit your products to the Google Shopping engine is to use the API (application programming interface) supplied by Google. We have recently implemented an automated product feed into Google Shopping for Miami Stainless, so now you can find their stainless steel products through Google Shopping e.g. search on ‘balustrade wire’.

On average it will take around 4 – 5 hours for us to implement automated integration of a Contact Point Shopping Cart website’s product information with the Google Shopping engine. You may elect to only send to Google products that aren’t on sale, or perhaps, certain categories of product – these sorts of rules can be programmed into the automated product feed from your online store.

Why not make the most of this opportunity in Google to place your products in front of more customers?

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Harnessing GPS (Location Services) within mobile applications

November 15th, 2014 by Hubert Yap

In this post PC era, large numbers of people now use smartphones and/or tablets to connect to each other in realtime because, unlike PCs, smartphones and tablets are not locked down in one location. Millions of people now carry a smartphone in their pocket (or tablet in their bag), pull it out anytime, and within seconds use it to chat with their friends/families, check what is on the news, find out what is causing the current traffic jam, share a photo of what they are experiencing, etc.

Mobile Apps and Location Services

One particular feature of smartphones and tablets that takes advantage of our mobility, is Location Services. Location Services allows a smartphone/tablet application to determine the device location via wireless connection or GPS and send it back to a server. This article will cover how Location Services can be useful for users and businesses alike, challenges in retrieving the device location, and how to address those challenges.

From a user point of view, Location Services allows them to send their location and receive specific information in return. Take for example the Google Map application. By using Google Map, users can send their device location and receive information about their whereabouts. This feature is particularly useful when we are travelling to a place we have never visited before. Generally people use Location Services to receive information that may only be relevant when they are at a specific location (i.e. nearby restaurants, local weather, nearby traffic congestion, movies in nearby cinema, friends who are nearby, etc).

From a business point of view, Location Services can be used to promote discoverability. An app can be configured to send specific information when a user is in a particular area. For example, if a business has a specific product catalogue for each city, their app can show the correct product catalogue to each user by retrieving the users’ location beforehand. Location Services can also be used to determine where business or consumer activities took place. This data has a wide range of uses.

All benefits come with drawbacks. For Location Services, one of the major concerns is battery life. If an app runs down the battery life of your device, you will limit your use of the app. That’s obviously not an option if the app is being used to carry out your job.

Wireless and GPS can only give a rough estimation of where the user is located. Therefore an app sometimes need to retrieve the users location 2-3 times in order to achieve better location precision. The longer we want the app to keep retrieving user location, the more battery power it will consume. This is one reason why a map application drains a lot of battery power. A typical map application needs to constantly retrieve the user’s location because the app is most often used when the user is walking or driving. It is important to achieve a balance between the battery power consumed and the location precision required. For example, if the app only needs to find which city the user is currently in, it can simply define a location precision of about 5 kilometres. Doing so will reduce the amount of battery power consumed compared to a location precision of a few hundred metres.

Another challenge that affects battery life is whether the app uses wireless, GPS, or a combination of both. GPS is more precise and faster when it comes to retrieving user location and is therefore a more recommended approach if your app needs to constantly updates the location. However, GPS is not suitable to retrieve user location when the user is inside a building due to the signal attenuation caused by construction materials. In such case, the app can only retrieve user location via the wireless network, assuming the user device is connected to one.

If the application needs to be able to retrieve user location in both indoor and outdoor, a combination of wireless and GPS is required. The app can be configured to use primarily GPS and only use wireless when GPS fails to retrieve user location, or use both at the same time and stop them if one has successfully received the location. The former will consume less battery power when the device is outdoor but there will be performance overhead when the device is indoors because the app will wait until GPS fails to retrieve user location before using wireless. On the other hand, the latter consumes more battery power on both indoor and outdoor but has better performance indoors.

Building an app that takes advantage of Location Services can give mutual benefits to both users and businesses. In summary, to make the best use of Location Services it is important to consider:

  1. How precise the retrieved user location needs to be,
  2. How often the app should retrieve user location,
  3. Where the user will mostly use the app: indoors, outdoors, or both.

Some examples of apps we have built for our clients which use Location Services are:

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Google Tag Manager: What is it and why do I need it?

September 23rd, 2014 by Trevor Robinson

Google Tag Manager (‘GTM’) is a free tag managing solution that enables website owners and marketing teams to have more control over the manner in which web traffic and visitor actions are measured throughout their websites, and allows consolidation of tracking across Google Analytics, Adwords, Remarketing, together with 3rd Party Vendors such as ClickTail. A tag is a snippet of code which can be used to measure website traffic and help analyse and identify your website visitors and their on-site behaviourial patterns. Tagging, when implemented well can yield powerful data to gauge the overall performance of your website and marketing efforts.

Whilst GTM was introduced by Google in 2012, it is really only recently that marketers and webmasters have started to take advantage of what it can offer. Once the single code snippet for GTM is added to your website, all of your tags can then be managed from GTM’s admin panel.

The Benefits of GTM

  • Efficiency – One of the most beneficial aspects of the Google Tag Manager from a website owner or marketers standpoint is efficiency.  Now that you can add, edit and test website tags directly through the GTM user interface, you will save both time and money as you won’t need to contact your developer each time a tag needs to be edited or added.
  • Enhanced tag management - As mentioned earlier, multiple website tags can really complicate the tag management process (especially if they are from different platforms or vendors). GTM allows you to view, edit and add tags through the GTM interface quickly and easily all from the one platform.
  • Event listeners - Tracking user interaction such as clicks, PDF downloads and form submissions is excitingly simple to accomplish with Google Tag Manager. Event listeners eliminate the need to manually tag each user interaction that you would like to track. Through the GTM admin panel you can target links or buttons by attributes that are already contained in the link such as an id, class or URL.
  • Testing and debugging – It’s always been good practice to ensure that your tags are firing (working) before they are published on the web. GTM comes with a built-in debugging window where you can test any tag changes on your website before they are published on your website.

While GTM empowers website owners and marketers with greater control and flexibility, development teams are also positively affected as they are able to focus on the more complex and technically demanding tasks.

We recommend watching the GTM introductory video created by Google which may give you a better visual understanding as to what the tag manager is and how it can help your business.

We have recently implemented the Google Tag Manager for the Contact Point website, and can confirm that there is a learning curve to understand how to use GTM. However, it will be worth the investment if the data it provides is analysed, and the insights gained from the analysis drive changes to the structure and functionality of your website. Changes made to your website as a result of your insights can then be very quickly monitored for the impact they are having on your metrics.

We particularly see that the GTM will be beneficial for eCommerce websites as it will allow webmasters to analyse behaviours such as:

  1. Sharing of product information in social media
  2. Clicking through to subscribe to your newsletter from a particular page
  3. Accessing online chat
  4. Customer Reviews emanating from follow up email
  5. Adding an item to your wish list
  6. Ascribing behaviours to the logged in user ID

Please get in touch with us for more information on Google’s Tag Manager or for any assistance with initial implementation.

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Have you noticed how easy Google makes it to search?

July 7th, 2013 by Heather Maloney

If you have you ever tried searches in Google like this:

  • ‘definition of altruism’
  • ‘convert 7 feet to metres’
  • or typed in an address you’re looking for

you’ll know that Google has been doing a lot of work to make search so much faster and easier for everyone. This is particularly important for people who are using smart phones to carry out their searches.

One of the more recently added features in the smart phone Google Search app is a set of “search cards” – or standard searches – that Google executes when you open the app. You can choose which ones you want, and they range from “time it will take me to get home” through to flight information (shown for a flight you have searched on before).

The only thing that I worry about with all this ease, and answers to readily at your fingertips, is that we’ll start (or maybe that started a long time before) using Google as the full and only source of truth. Your thoughts?

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Online Stores – should you be sending an automated request for a review?

April 12th, 2013 by Heather Maloney

I recently received an email from an online store from which I purchased some clothing (I’ve been their customer for many years), providing me with a set of thumbnails for the items I had purchased a couple of weeks ago, and asking me to provide a review. The email was interesting because:

  • it came from an actual person at the company from whom I’d purchased (rather than the usual generic email address of sales type emails).
  • it encouraged me to provide customer reviews to help other customers make the right choices – appealing to altruism.
  • it displayed in stars, the average usual rating that the particular products I had purchased received.
  • it gave me links through for each particular product, to make it quick for me to rate particular items.
  • it provided me with instructions and a link to login and change my preferences so that I no longer receive product review emails.

The email also provided at the bottom some links and images for new arrivals, and top rated styles.

This email has a great feel about it – more like a value-add than a sales tool. Of course, if I click through and provide my review, I’m going to be bang in the middle of the store, and highly likely to start browsing through items again, and possibly make another purchase. Overall, it’s a great way to continue the engagement with your customers, and it’s all automated based on a previous purchase.

How would you feel about receiving the email I’ve described? Please share your thoughts by adding your comment below.

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