Archive for the ‘electronic marketing’ Category

Google Tag Manager: What is it and why do I need it?

September 23rd, 2014 by Trevor Robinson

Google Tag Manager (‘GTM’) is a free tag managing solution that enables website owners and marketing teams to have more control over the manner in which web traffic and visitor actions are measured throughout their websites, and allows consolidation of tracking across Google Analytics, Adwords, Remarketing, together with 3rd Party Vendors such as ClickTail. A tag is a snippet of code which can be used to measure website traffic and help analyse and identify your website visitors and their on-site behaviourial patterns. Tagging, when implemented well can yield powerful data to gauge the overall performance of your website and marketing efforts.

Whilst GTM was introduced by Google in 2012, it is really only recently that marketers and webmasters have started to take advantage of what it can offer. Once the single code snippet for GTM is added to your website, all of your tags can then be managed from GTM’s admin panel.

The Benefits of GTM

  • Efficiency – One of the most beneficial aspects of the Google Tag Manager from a website owner or marketers standpoint is efficiency.  Now that you can add, edit and test website tags directly through the GTM user interface, you will save both time and money as you won’t need to contact your developer each time a tag needs to be edited or added.
  • Enhanced tag management - As mentioned earlier, multiple website tags can really complicate the tag management process (especially if they are from different platforms or vendors). GTM allows you to view, edit and add tags through the GTM interface quickly and easily all from the one platform.
  • Event listeners - Tracking user interaction such as clicks, PDF downloads and form submissions is excitingly simple to accomplish with Google Tag Manager. Event listeners eliminate the need to manually tag each user interaction that you would like to track. Through the GTM admin panel you can target links or buttons by attributes that are already contained in the link such as an id, class or URL.
  • Testing and debugging – It’s always been good practice to ensure that your tags are firing (working) before they are published on the web. GTM comes with a built-in debugging window where you can test any tag changes on your website before they are published on your website.

While GTM empowers website owners and marketers with greater control and flexibility, development teams are also positively affected as they are able to focus on the more complex and technically demanding tasks.

We recommend watching the GTM introductory video created by Google which may give you a better visual understanding as to what the tag manager is and how it can help your business.

We have recently implemented the Google Tag Manager for the Contact Point website, and can confirm that there is a learning curve to understand how to use GTM. However, it will be worth the investment if the data it provides is analysed, and the insights gained from the analysis drive changes to the structure and functionality of your website. Changes made to your website as a result of your insights can then be very quickly monitored for the impact they are having on your metrics.

We particularly see that the GTM will be beneficial for eCommerce websites as it will allow webmasters to analyse behaviours such as:

  1. Sharing of product information in social media
  2. Clicking through to subscribe to your newsletter from a particular page
  3. Accessing online chat
  4. Customer Reviews emanating from follow up email
  5. Adding an item to your wish list
  6. Ascribing behaviours to the logged in user ID

Please get in touch with us for more information on Google’s Tag Manager or for any assistance with initial implementation.

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Online Stores – should you be sending an automated request for a review?

April 12th, 2013 by Heather Maloney

I recently received an email from an online store from which I purchased some clothing (I’ve been their customer for many years), providing me with a set of thumbnails for the items I had purchased a couple of weeks ago, and asking me to provide a review. The email was interesting because:

  • it came from an actual person at the company from whom I’d purchased (rather than the usual generic email address of sales type emails).
  • it encouraged me to provide customer reviews to help other customers make the right choices – appealing to altruism.
  • it displayed in stars, the average usual rating that the particular products I had purchased received.
  • it gave me links through for each particular product, to make it quick for me to rate particular items.
  • it provided me with instructions and a link to login and change my preferences so that I no longer receive product review emails.

The email also provided at the bottom some links and images for new arrivals, and top rated styles.

This email has a great feel about it – more like a value-add than a sales tool. Of course, if I click through and provide my review, I’m going to be bang in the middle of the store, and highly likely to start browsing through items again, and possibly make another purchase. Overall, it’s a great way to continue the engagement with your customers, and it’s all automated based on a previous purchase.

How would you feel about receiving the email I’ve described? Please share your thoughts by adding your comment below.

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Using email as part of your Inbound Marketing Strategy

August 28th, 2012 by Heather Maloney

Inbound Marketing is one of the newer marketing buzz words that I’m sure you have heard about from time-time. But with the marketing landscape moving at ever increasing speeds, many business owners miss the definition of these new marketing strategies for their business.

Inbound marketing isn’t complicated, however, and can be easily applied to your business.

At its essence, inbound marketing is about giving your customers the opportunity to engage with you; it is bringing them to you rather than you going to them. The term has come from the premise of “permission marketing” that was made famous by marketing guru Seth Godin and ties in with the move away from telling clients what to do via fliers, print advertising and TV advertising (outbound marketing) and, instead, speaking with your customers, not at them, and allowing them to grant permission for you to market to them.

A good example of inbound marketing is rather than using the traditional marketing technique of direct mail to sell your services to unknown contacts, you develop a regular Blog on your website that discuss topics within your business services, highlighting your knowledge-base as a leader in your industry. Your Blog posts will give you more qualified leads from prospects wanting to contact you due to your expertise.

Much of inbound marketing is related to the use of Social Media, which goes beyond the platforms of Facebook and Twitter and includes such things as adding your details to online directories that allow for customer feedback, and the writing of BLOGs, articles and email marketing campaigns. Also consider e-books, videos, whitepapers and podcasts.

A quick test of your inbound marketing is to Google yourself and your business name. If you are using the technique well, then a number of links from different sites will appear in the search result, all leading back to your business website and contact details. For an example, see the image below.

Example Inbound Marketing Links from web search

How does email marketing work within your inbound marketing strategy?
Email marketing is a critical component within your business’ inbound marketing strategy. As your target audience (after reading your articles, blogs and other social posts) opt in to hear more, your organisation has the opportunity to take each subscriber through a series of messages to help them solve a particular problem, or understand your organisation better. Alternatively, if the subscriber signed up to receive updates / news from you, these types of messages can provide valuable and practical examples of how your products / services can benefit the subscriber. An eNudge Email marketing message also gives you and your readers the opportunity to share your message in various platforms, e.g. Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, etc, allowing for new prospects to find you and learn about your industry knowledge.

Inbound marketing allows you to start building a customer relationship before a person has had any telephone or physical contact with you.

In addition, a good inbound marketing strategy will organically work on your Search Engine Optimisation!

To discuss how eNudge and our Message Series (systemizing a series of communications) can assist with your inbound marketing strategy, contact us via 1300 137 628 or info@eNudge.com.au.

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Online Technologies to consider for your business

May 30th, 2012 by Heather Maloney

The following online technologies have broad application across many industries, to help you increase awareness of your brand, products and services, strengthen relationships with existing customers, build community around your brand, position you as a thought leader in your industry or area of expertise, increase sales, and generate more leads.

Do a mental stocktake on how many of these technologies you are successfully employing:

  1. website - there are some businesses that still don’t have a website, or have a site that presents their organisation in a poor light, so I can’t leave that off the list. Your website may have more than one objective – make sure that it’s achieving your goal/s, whether that’s to generate leads, automate distribution of valuable information, build your credibility, facilitate sales…
  2. email marketing – despite the scourge of spam, and how long this medium has been used, it’s still the greatest tool of many of our clients for generating sales and enquiry, increasing customer retention and providing better service. You should encourage visitors to your website to register for your regular emails, but also promote this through offline channels (think business cards, brochures, invoices…).
  3. SMS marketing – a well executed SMS campaign can generate an immediate response. Of course, as per email marketing, you’re going to be obeying the Australian Spam Act to the letter, so an SMS won’t be a surprise to your customers.
  4. blog - pointing your readers to your website’s blog will drive traffic to your site (where hopefully they will explore more than your blog, or read related posts and add their comments), and allow them to interact with you and others on your chosen topic. It has the added advantage of being great for your rank in the search engines, especially if you choose your topic heading well and utilise social media and SEO friendly URLs.
  5. social media – dubbed “the personalisation of business”, the astute use of social media can help your organisation connect on deeper levels with your customers, understand your customers better, build community around your brand, and establish you as a thought leader within your industry or area of expertise. And it doesn’t have to take up vast amounts of your precious time.
  6. pay per click online advertisements – for the right category, a well written online ad linking through to a strategically written landing page, can be very productive for generating sales and enquiries. Social media and the proliferation of rich information about the website visitor’s preferences and behaviours, now provides the opportunity for very targeted ads.
  7. video – a powerful medium for connecting with a wider audience. Video allows you to convey your message much more richly than text and imagery.
  8. mobile applications – the use of mobile devices to browse the web and carry out web based activites has increased exponentially over the past few years. Every B2C website should strongly consider having at least a mobile friendly version of their website. Apps provide a unique opportunity to deliver market leading tools, build loyalty, and increase customer retention.
  9. online surveys – don’t groan! These used a strategic points in the delivery of customer service, or customer enquiry, can allow you to deliver the right clients to your sales team, and gather rich information about your customer’s desires.
  10. QR codes – a smart phone readable bar code allowing you to quickly take a customer to your web page after they scan the code you’ve placed in your email, on your printed poster, on a billboard…

When employing these technologies, you should endeavour to link them together to gain cost effectiveness, richer engagement and provide a consistent message across all fronts. They should also reflect your offline marketing.

If you would like to discuss the appropriateness of any of the above technologies for your business, and exactly how it could be used for your benefit, feel free to get in touch.

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Thanks to all those who attended the High Hopes High Tea!

March 19th, 2012 by Heather Maloney

Thank you so much to the representatives from each of the following organisations for attending yesterday’s annual fund raising event for the St.Kilda Gatehouse:

I am truly grateful that you were so generous with your time, and helped us to all have a lovely afternoon of specialty teas, fresh cappuccinos and more delectable cakes and sandwiches than we could eat!

Thank you so much!
Heather Maloney
St.Kilda High Hopes

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Breaking News and Technology – Gillard vs Rudd

February 27th, 2012 by Heather Maloney

As political journalists across the country are poised for the next stage of the saga between Julia Gillard and Kevin Rudd, technology is helping us to keep up to date with all manner of up to the minute broadcasts from Canberra. For example:

  1. Live webcam as the media, from two different angles and corridors in the Parliament building, wait for the ALP politicians to come out of their vote for either Ms Gillard or Mr Rudd.
  2. If you don’t want to watch the webcam, the politics blog page of the The Age is being updated every 5 minutes or so with another comment or photo to keep you up to date.
  3. You can follow tweets attached to particular hashtags in Twitter to hear the news as it comes to hand.

I wonder what the price was for advertising space on the political pages of the national newspapers during this morning?

In a nutshell… there’s no need to stay in the dark for very long, whether you are sitting at a computer or using your mobile phone!

What’s your favourite way of watching the news unfold?

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How CNET setout to refresh their list

February 7th, 2012 by Heather Maloney

It got my attention, so I thought I’d share with you the recently distributed “database refresh” message sent out by CNET to try and get their audience to read their messages or re-engage.

The subject of the newsletter below was the first thing to get my attention. It read: “Is this goodbye? CNET will miss you.” I couldn’t help wonder what it was all about, as I skimmed that subject line (I skim due to the volume of email I receive on a daily basis). In an instant, they had piqued my curiosity and I found myself opening their email!

CNET list refresh email

Next, I saw the big CNET logo, and then I read their first paragraph, where they explained that they “loved it when I would click “open” on their emails” and that they wanted me back. Cute. The rest of the email was very simple, and set out to show me why I should be opening and reading their emails based on the value they provide. So, now that their brand is firmly back in my mind, I may well open more of their emails in future. :-)

What do you think of this strategy? Have you used a different “list refresh” strategy or had someone use a successful one on you?

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Landing Page Design Trends for 2012 – Website Magazine – Website Magazine

January 17th, 2012 by Heather Maloney

Following the key points described in the article below will benefit the design of your home page, landing page, or email marketing campaign.

Landing Page Design Trends for 2012 – Website Magazine – Website Magazine.

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Social Media doesn’t kill email; it becomes an amplifier for the message

May 29th, 2011 by Heather Maloney

Social media amplifies your email messageI read the above statement in an article on Business 2 Business Community on the topic of 2011 PR Trends: Email and Social Engagement. The author was saying that the ability to engage with your audience through email isn’t diminished by the advent of social media and sites such as Twitter and Facebook, but instead the engagement can be augmented by making it easy to share your email message via social media as well.

A couple of years ago, we added Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter icons to images available in eNudge and suggested that you should use these to point people to your organisation’s presence on these social sites (review our June 2009 newsletter). Sharing your email content in this way requires you to hyperlink the icons to a version of your email message that you have placed on your website. However, to make this less work for you, we’re considering adding the ability to insert automated links to “tweet this” and “share this on Facebook” to your eNudge email messages. That will allow your contacts to share an online version of your email message (of course without the personalised content) which will be hosted on the eNudge server; a bit like the functionality to “View this email in a browser”. So that we can gauge interest, please let us know by commenting on our blog if you would like the social sharing functionality added!

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Having a One on One Conversation

August 10th, 2010 by Heather Maloney

Personalising your email or SMS messages in a useful way will help your contacts to feel like you are having a one to one conversation with them, and will help them feel like a valued client, not just one of the masses.

So what do I mean by a “useful way”? It’s pretty easy to add the firstname to your message – people expect that level of personalisation even in what is obviously a bulk email send now. What is useful for your clients / customers is going to be different from another organisation, but here are some ideas to get your creative juices flowing:

  • expiry date of your customer’s account / subscription
  • number of loyalty points they currently hold
  • address and contact details that you currently store on file for your contact (ask them to update you if the details have changed)
  • last item that the customer purchased online (so that you can ask them what their experience has been like with that product, or you can ask them to rate your customer service during the transaction).
  • We’d love to hear what other ways you can imagine personalising your messages – reply to this post below.

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